5 Exotic Fruits of Costa Rica

One of Costa Rica’s most noticeable features is the vast forest that covers much of the country. A dense cluster of green can be seen from almost every angle when visiting which is what gives the country such a widespread selection of wildlife. It also means that all these trees and plants have much opportunity to grow and sprout fruit, thus the island is home to an abundance of tasty tree picked varieties. Here you can experience the flavours that can only happen in hot, humid and truly tropical conditions as the gifts of the plant life here come in many shapes and sizes. From juicy sharp citrus fruit to large nutty and milky substances, the flora here is rich with edible magic, just see for yourself.

Passion Fruit

This small put unmistakably vibrant flavoured fruit comes in differing varieties here in Costa Rica. The Maracuyá has a more yellow skin and is smaller to the deeper more orange and slightly sweeter Granadilla. These little round numbers can be cut open to reveal the many slippery seeds inside. Although they don’t look very appealing to the eyes the taste, they hold is surprisingly tasty and serves as a great ingredient for local ice cream.

Carambola

The carambola is often more commonly referred to as the star fruit. This is thanks to the several deep ridges which run along the length of the cylindrical fruits that result in wonderful star shapes when sliced widthways. These fruits aren’t just tasty but versatile as they can be eaten whole and are used to make up sweet treats as well as complimenting salads and topping other meals.

Cas

These are Costa Rican guavas which unlike the other breeds is smaller, greener and significantly more tart. Guavas usually have a burst of almost berry like flavour whereas these ones are coupled more closely with a lime. This doesn’t make them any less useful or widespread for that matter, instead they are a huge part of a local drink which is sharp tangy and wonderfully refreshing in the blazing sun. Just be aware that as with many guava varieties there may be some worms inside here, though the locals don’t seem very bothered by them.

Mamones
Mamones

Mamones

Sometimes called the Spanish lime, these fruits are very small indeed and grow to only about a couple inches meaning they can look like vastly underdeveloped versions of the Cas guava but are actually something different entirely. Bite into one of these and you will find a salmon coloured pulp that thickly coats the single seed at the centre. They have a distinct citrus flavour and couple nicely with a sweeter fruit for an exotic mix.

Guanábana
Guanábana

Guanábana

The soursop is an alternative name this fruit grows by, referring to a green bulging fruit that is covered in spikes. They can look like huge green artichokes when left to form fully but taste vastly different. Their exotic flavour is such a beautiful mix of aromas and tastes that people can’t quite agree, some state it tastes like strawberry and apple while others think it’s more banana and pineapple. Either way this big fruit with its milky pulp is a favourite in the region for smoothies, sorbets and fruit drinks.